A Healthy Blog

Massachusetts health care — wonky, with a healthy dose of reality

Important Update Regarding Immigrants’ Use of Benefits

Important Update Regarding Immigrants’ Use of Benefits

September 24, 2018
You may have heard about proposed policy changes that could affect immigrants’ use of public benefits (government programs that may help you pay for food, housing, health care such as MassHealth and other living expenses). New federal regulations are proposing to change the definition of who is a “Public Charge,” a person who is likely to become dependent on the government for financial and material support. This change could affect the ability to adjust status or petition for a family member. 

HCFA wants to make sure that you have the most accurate information about these changes, so that you can make the best decision for you and your family. 

  • There has been no change to the “public charge” rules at this point if you are in the US and contemplating adjusting your immigration status or sponsoring someone who is already here. These are proposed regulations that still need to go through a formal federal review process before changes are made.
  • Currently, the only benefits considered under “public charge” are cash benefits (Supplemental Security Income or Transitional Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or payment for long-term care institutionalization).
  • Over the next several months, the proposed rule could potentially impact other benefits, including: MassHealth (except MassHealth Limited); Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP/food stamps); Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Subsidy; Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program; Section 8 Project-Based Rental Assistance; and Public Housing. There is no need to disenroll from these programs at this time. If the regulations are approved, individuals will have 60 days to withdraw from them before they impact people. After that time, the use of these benefits is dependent on other factors that should be discussed with an immigration counselor or attorney.
  • If you are sponsoring a family member who is currently living outside the country, you should check with an immigration counselor or attorney about whether receiving public benefits could affect your pending petition.
 
Health Care For All (HCFA), the Massachusetts Immigrant Refugee Advocacy Coalition (MIRA), Health Law Advocates (HLA) and many other organizations work to protect Massachusetts immigrants and ensure they have the right to access public benefits, including health care.

To learn more about changes regarding the “Public Charge” determination and how to be part of the campaign to oppose these changes, you can send an email to [email protected].

Attached here is a list of organizations that are trusted in the community and provide free immigration services. Some of these organizations may have limited capacity and may not accept new cases, please call first to ensure that they can help you.